Do you have any recommendations for books about clothing history?   (I’ll accept recs for pretty much anything about historical clothing, textiles etc, but something that has info about garment construction would be stellar!)

Why the fuck is River Song wearing an 1880s dress when she says she just came from ice skating in 1814?

So, when my little sister and I were much younger, we had a great love of historical costume, but few resources.

No hardship can keep us from our glorious bustles.  (If this ends up on This Is Not Victorian, I will be soooo happy. :P)

(via The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Beachwear)

1860s-70s bathing suit

(via The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Beachwear)

1860s-70s bathing suit

fripperiesandfobs:

Afternoon dress ca. 1870-75

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art

I find it hard to articulate the sheer excitement I get from historical clothing.  I say this as a casual novice who mostly just lurks and stares at collections, skimming descriptions and being psyched out of my mind when I recognize patterns, eras, designs.  In the overwhelming wealth of history and culture behind, the intertwining stories that influence the costumes, it’s exhiliarating to do so much as point out the shape of a bodice, recognize a silhouette and assign an era to it, to identify techniques and materials and have words for all of these now-obsolete garments.  It’s like making order out of chaos.  I know it was never chaos to start with, but that’s how it was in my mind years ago; all of the styles of dressing that came before my time were once clumped very lazily into scattered chunks: The Retro, The “Olden Days” (17-1800s), the nebulous middle-ages, the ancient world (consisting only of egypt and greece and some fuzzy generic culture I had filed away as ‘biblical’)

As much as I try to assign an exact origin and motive for this excitement, I still can’t exactly place why I look at some blogs, websites, books and am filled with this uncontainable urge to SQUEE.  To point at the beautiful pictures and shout “LOOK AT THIS!” to anyone.  It’s not just the fantasy of decorating myself with these beautiful things.  It’s the thrill of making sense of these beautiful trends and creations, reading the stories and sensing patterns.  Yes, there is an ‘order out of chaos’ element.  The changing of silhouettes is not merely a pointless occurrence on a timeline; it’s deeply tied into the political and social changes of the times.  The colors of fabrics aren’t just pretty to look at, they’re incidental with revolutionary technologies- the use of new dyes and techniques.  The way demand for certain fashions, certain fashion resources, influence economies, foster cultural exchange, start wars, stoke revolutions.

God, I love this.  I am so pumped to know more.  I am so intimidated and yet out-of-my-mind excited by the seemingly limitless information available!  Why wouldn’t anyone love this?

omgthatdress:

1870s dress via The Kyoto Costume Institute

omgthatdress:

1870s dress via The Kyoto Costume Institute

lostsplendor:

1886, Source: NYPL
This woman has an excellent outfit.

One of my favorite bodice styles. 

lostsplendor:

1886, Source: NYPL

This woman has an excellent outfit.

One of my favorite bodice styles. 

(via )

omgthatdress:

Evening dress ca. 1884 via The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

omgthatdress:

Evening dress ca. 1884 via The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

ornamentedbeing:

Or will tomorrow’s theme be purple?
Silk gown from 1869-1870 at the V&A Museum.

This is a nice purple dress.
Very purple-y.

ornamentedbeing:

Or will tomorrow’s theme be purple?

Silk gown from 1869-1870 at the V&A Museum.

This is a nice purple dress.

Very purple-y.

theeverydaygoth:

My ideal silhouette. 

I really do love this bustle-era silhouette from before the sleeves started getting big and mutton-y. (1870’s-ish?)  That’s what I like most about a lot of the 18th century silhouettes too; the close-fitting sleeves and bodice with a big ostentatious skirt.

theeverydaygoth:

My ideal silhouette. 

I really do love this bustle-era silhouette from before the sleeves started getting big and mutton-y. (1870’s-ish?)  That’s what I like most about a lot of the 18th century silhouettes too; the close-fitting sleeves and bodice with a big ostentatious skirt.

treselegant:

“A Modern Waist”
(Punch).

"JONES (to himself, as he offers Miss Vane a cup of tea and some strawberries): By Jove!  She takes ‘em- she’s going to swallow ‘em!  But where she’ll put ‘em- goodness knows!”

treselegant:

“A Modern Waist”

(Punch).

"JONES (to himself, as he offers Miss Vane a cup of tea and some strawberries): By Jove!  She takes ‘em- she’s going to swallow ‘em!  But where she’ll put ‘em- goodness knows!”

(via )

ouroboring:

“LOL”
I think there are more somewhere too…

"Arabella Maria: Only to think, Julia dear, that our Mothers wore such ridiculous fashions as these.
Both: Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha!”
Hey, you show some fucking respect for Regency, hoopskirt-lady.  >:T

(Also- “Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha!)

ouroboring:

“LOL”

I think there are more somewhere too…

"Arabella Maria: Only to think, Julia dear, that our Mothers wore such ridiculous fashions as these.

Both: Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha!”

Hey, you show some fucking respect for Regency, hoopskirt-lady.  >:T

(Also- “Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha!)

(via ogreheart)

defunctfashion:

Scarlet Lace Front Boot | c. 1890 

defunctfashion:

Scarlet Lace Front Boot | c. 1890 

defunctfashion:

Lasserre | c. 1883

defunctfashion:

Lasserre | c. 1883